Housebuilders Ordered To Protect British Wildlife

Burflex House, Clay Street, Hull, East Yorkshire, HU8 8HA E. info@burflex.co.uk

Burflex House, Clay Street, Hull, East Yorkshire, HU8 8HA E. info@burflex.co.uk

Housebuilders Ordered To Protect British Wildlife

Housebuilders Ordered To Protect British Wildlife

Housing developers have been ordered by the government to do more to protect wildlife around the country, with expectations now set out on how specific species can be protected

This includes using hollow swift bricks, for example, which can be installed in the walls of new build properties to allow birds to nest safely. Hedgehog highways can also be used to help protect hedgehogs – important since there are now fewer than one million left in the wild.

Communities secretary James Brokenshire also called on developers to plant more green meadows and trees in order to help provide safe havens for insects such as the British honey bee.

He said: “Building the new homes this country needs must not come at the detriment of our natural heritage. It’s right that as we deliver houses for people, we must also provide homes for wildlife too – whether that’s for hedgehogs, frogs, newts or birds.

“The public have told us that protecting wildlife is important to them – so my message to house builders is to harness this support and get building in a way that protects the environment for the next generation.”

Companies should consider the long-term impact of their developments on the local ecosystem, during and after construction, including placing greater emphasis on new ways to allow nature to survive and thrive. This could include ideas such as drainage areas to create wetlands for amphibians and birds to live in the same places as people.

Checking out the Wildlife Trusts website could prove beneficial for any developers keen to do their bit to protect British wildlife in the future, as well. The organisation works with developers, planners and construction firms to ensure space is made for wildlife and habitats in new housing and development – so the perfect place to go for some advice.

The concern is that, with the government now undertaking the biggest housebuilding drive for 70 years, that huge damage could be caused to wildlife and wild places, including the loss of ancient woodlands, wetlands, wildflower meadows and rare habitats because of development happening in the wrong place.

It is possible to devise nature-focused housing developments that have been designed with green infrastructure and environmental sensitivity in mind. This will enable people to enjoy easy access to nature on their doorstep, as well as providing numerous social, environmental and economic benefits.

As a case study, take a look at the Trumpington Meadows nature reserve that makes up part of a housing development just outside Cambridge. When the land was earmarked for development, the local council stated that large green corridors were necessary to connect the centre of the city through the new development to the outlying countryside.

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