Historic Archaeological Remains Discovered In East Yorkshire!

Burflex House, Clay Street, Hull, East Yorkshire, HU8 8HA E. info@burflex.co.uk

Burflex House, Clay Street, Hull, East Yorkshire, HU8 8HA E. info@burflex.co.uk

Historic Archaeological Remains Discovered In East Yorkshire!

Historic Archaeological Remains Discovered In East Yorkshire!

Construction work on massive flood water storage lagoons could potentially be delayed on the site of the Cottingham and Orchard Park Flood Alleviation Scheme thanks to the discovery of archaeological remains in the area.

According to the Hull Daily Mail, walls have been uncovered that could be of historical interest, with a spokesman for East Riding Council saying that the investigation is still ongoing so the picture about what has been unearthed is still not entirely clear.

The representative went on to note that they have asked the contractor to speed the work up so that the construction job isn’t delayed, with archaeologists having been on site since October.

“This is, however, routine work and details of the investigations being carried out are not fully known. Final details on the specifics of any findings will be published once analysis and reporting is completed. We can’t provide reports of archaeological works until they are complete,” the insider was quoted as saying by the news source.

The project itself will see nine lagoons constructed along the Raywell Valley and in Orchard Park, with Hull City Council and East Riding of Yorkshire Council now set to spend £22 million to afford approximately 4,000 homes better protection after they were affected badly during the floods that took place back in 2007.

This flood scheme will complement two other similar schemes in the local area – the Willerby Derringham Flood Alleviation Scheme and the Analby and East Ella Flood Alleviation Scheme. All three are working together to have a combined beneficial effect on the urban drainage system that has a finite capacity, since it relies on pumped operation.

Back in October 2017, the Hull Daily Mail revealed that work had begun on the £22 million scheme. Once complete, the lagoons will have the capacity to hold back 300,000 cubic metres of flood water, which is the equivalent of 120 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

In 2007, the region was badly affected by flooding that took place on June 25th, with over 9,000 homes and businesses flooded in Hull alone, while 95 out of 98 schools sustained damage. Not only that but one life was lost in the freak weather event, after 96mm of water fell at the River Hull and 105mm at Saltend. Some 250mm of rain fell throughout the month of June, with more than 70mm falling on June 15th and more than 110mm on June 25th.

Michael Barnett, 28, sadly lost his life that day after he entered a drain in Astral Close in Hessle to help clear debris. His leg got stuck in a grille and despite the efforts of the emergency services to help him he succumbed to hypothermia, the only fatality of the flooding.

For scaffolders in Hull, get in touch with us today.