Hull’s Waterfront Changes Revealed!

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Burflex House, Clay Street, Hull, East Yorkshire, HU8 8HA E. info@burflex.co.uk

Hull’s Waterfront Changes Revealed!

Hull’s Waterfront Changes Revealed!

There’s a new project in the pipeline for the waterfront in Hull, part of a £42 million Environment Agency scheme that if given the go ahead will see a series of new flood walls and gates constructed at sites that stretch from Victoria Dock to St Andrews Quay – with the aim being to protect 113,000 properties.

The Hull Daily Mail has revealed what will happen at each site in order to accommodate the defences, which will include glazed panels, higher walls, new seating and landscaping.

For example at St Andrews Quay, a new concrete tidal flood defence wall is set to be built at the back edge of the TransPennine Trail footpath and cycleway, set back a bit from the edge of the defences that are already in existence.

And West of Makro, a new concrete wall is to be built perpendicular to the waterfront to help cut the flow route off over the Cod Farm site. The wall will be built to a defence level of 6.5m.

The area around the Lost Trawlermen memorial is going to be redesigned, subject to approval, with the new flood wall being included in the gardens area. At St Andrew’s Dock, new flood walls will be constructed next to Mr Chu’s restaurant, while a temporary modular concrete will run alongside the estuary around a space that’s been reserved for a separate memorial to lost trawlermen.

At William Wright Dock, concrete coping is set to be added to the existing flood defence walls, to help provide it with enough protection from flooding until 2040 at least. Island Wharf, the area next to Humber Quays, is one of three sites where outline planning approval is now being sought before more detailed plans can be submitted for each location.

And at Albert Dock, more concrete coping could be installed at the western end of the dock, while a new flood defence wall is being considered for the eastern end. Waterproofing and structural strengthening work is also set to be carried out on an external wall of a waterfront warehouse, which already forms part of the existing flood defences on the dock.

Emeritus professor of geography, adviser to the Environment Agency and expert in Britain’s estuaries Lynne Frostic recently explained to the Guardian that Hull faces water coming at it from all directions, which makes it “uniquely vulnerable to flooding”.

She said that the North Sea poses a risk, there’s rainfall to consider and Hull is essentially a sink with the “taps on full if it’s raining hard [with] very few overflows. There are risks from ground water flooding in parts of the city. If you asked for planning permission to put Hull where it is now, you’d probably be refused”.

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